Archive for July, 2009


July 30, 2009

Today’s Quote

Author: admin

“Style, like a fingerprint, is unique and individual.  It belongs to the person. Your style is an invention. It is a creation of who you are.”  Visit GalleryFive.com.

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July 29, 2009

History of Silk Production

Author: Art-In-My-Closet

handpaintedSilk is a hallmark of luxurious lifestyles and has been so since its earliest days of development. The material was first utilized in China, perhaps as long as 8,000 years ago. Silk garments couldn’t be acquired by just anyone – they were reserved for Chinese kings, the royal family, and honored guests. When the silk trade began to gather steam, demand for the luxury fabric rose to lofty new heights.

In ancient times, silk was traded to such far-flung regions as Egypt, India, Europe and North Africa. The Chinese succeeded for many years at keeping their silkworms a secret – that allowed them to control the silk market without any competition. Eventually, spies discovered the key to production, and silk manufacturing spread throughout the globe. To this day, handpainted silk scarves and other fashion-savvy garments remain in high demand.

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July 26, 2009

ARTIST PROFILE: Sheena Cameron

Author: Cathy Lynn

 

one-of-a-kind raku fired ceramic 13"L, 8"H, 3 1/2"W

one-of-a-kind raku fired ceramic 13"L, 8"H, 3 1/2"W

Sheena received her B.F.A. in ceramic sculpture in 1969 and spent the next 33 years making art jewelry. She moved to New Mexico in 1981. In 2003 she got back into working with clay, started experimenting with making horses and they seemed to take on a life of their own. Soon, and after much hard work, they evolved into what you see today and have become very popular.  See more ceramic horses at Gallery Five and more to come in the fall 2009.

Most of Sheena Cameron’s pieces are raku. Some are fired in a Japanese style wood burning kiln and some are stoneware. Because of the nature of these one-of-a-kind pieces, the prices vary widely. She uses genuine gemstones and other unique additions. All of the legs are masonry nails. Many of the horses open and close and have a lot of detail work.

Each horse comes with its own miniature book. On one side is a horse picture and several paragraphs about the general symbolism. Handwritten on the other side is the name of that particular horse, a list of all the components and gemstones, their symbolism, and the symbolism of the piece as a whole. And of course each owner will be bringing her or his own personal symbolism to the piece.

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July 22, 2009

ARTIST PROFILE: Louise Blumberg

Author: Cathy Lynn

louiseblumbergUnique flowing hand painted silk jackets in distinctive vibrant colors to match your every mood.  

Find them at: galleryfive.com.

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

Louise Blumberg  was educated at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, Louise received her B.A. in Fine Arts. She studied jewelry and surface pattern design at the Stockport College in Manchester, England, and served for eight years as a gold and silversmith. Since 1981, Louise has concentrated on her fabric designs and maintains a studio in the hills above Santa Barbara, California. She is known for her bold, hand-painted silk jackets, blazers, vests, scarves, and ties. Her vivid patterns range from graphic, ethnic designs to flowing, organic compositions. Each lightweight garment incorporates an exquisite selection of colors for maximum versatility as well as artistic drama.

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July 19, 2009

ARTIST PROFILE: Ellen Gienger

Author: Cathy Lynn

ellen_finalEllen Gienger studied fine art at California State University and the School for Art Institute of Chicago, learned about dyes, and applied her innate talent to creating her own fabrics.  Both her fabrics and her dye recipes are constantly evolving – consequently, her work reflects the process-oriented nature of her thinking. The elegant pieced coats and jackets sewn from her vibrant fabrics have an Asian overtone, and she acknowledges her lifelong appreciation of the Japanese aesthetic and culture.

Artist’s Statement

My purpose as a clothing designer is to dress a woman so that she feels confident, beautiful, feminine, and one-of-a-kind.

My art to wear hand-dyed and hand-painted silk designs look great on many different body types from xxx small to xxx large. Each shape is classic and never goes out of style. Although I do not base my designs on fashion trends, I am influenced by fashion elements like color and length, which play a role in my decisions from season to season. Most of my color choices are inspired by nature and each color category of the collection can be easily understood i.e., earth tones which include fire, rocks, sky, plants, water, jewel, brights, neutrals, color with black or without and oh yes… things to eat. I love the colors of food, mostly vegetables, tomato, mustard, celery, coffee, red wines, eggplant, chocolate!!!

 

 

 

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July 15, 2009

Tea Time at the Garden Party

Author: Art-In-My-Closet

ceramic-tea-setMany women across America enjoy growing and admiring flowers. More and more garden clubs have sprouted up recently, and many of them are held in a different venue each week. As a new member, you will most likely be called upon to host at some point in the near future. Hosting your first garden party can be a nerve-racking experience, but it doesn’t have to be.

Proper preparation makes all the difference; if you plan every detail well in advance, you can rest assured knowing the party will be a hit. Bear in mind that first impressions really do count; your table presentation matters just as much as your green thumb. A chic, colorful ceramic tea set should leave an indelible mark. Once tea and hors d’oeuvres have been served, get ready to boast about your blooms. With one successful party in the bag, you’ll have a proven template for future soirees.

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July 14, 2009

The Art of Glass Blowing

Author: admin

Glass BlowingHand blown glass art has a rich and fascinating history. While glass was being made for many thousands of years, possibly as early as 2500 BC, the art of glass blowing wasn’t invented until around 50 BC. Prior to that time, glass pieces were shaped by wrapping heated glass around a clay core, which was later removed, creating a vessel. During this period, making things from glass was not an artistic so much as a practical endeavor. Glass was not commonly owned and used in those early days, with only the very rich able to afford it.

Around 50 BC, it was discovered that glass could be formed by blowing, opening up a whole world of possibility for creating glass pieces. Blowing glass was a much more efficient way of making vessels, and glass became more common during the days of the Roman Empire. It was during this time that glassmakers began to experiment and become much more creative and intricate with their glass designs, elevating this utilitarian task to a true art form. In addition to creating useful objects, blown glass artists began creating decorative pieces, as well.

Glass Goes Underground
Production of glass pieces slowed during the dark ages, but by the Middle Ages, glassmaking began to resurface, primarily in the form of stained-glass windows. Blown glass art was less common, but Italian artists continued the tradition. Glass artisans in Venice eventually came together to form The Venetian  Glassmakers’ Guild. Unfortunately, the Venetian glassmakers were exiled to the island of Murano in 1291, partly to keep their techniques for glass blowing secret, and partly to remove the danger of fires in Venice caused by glassblowers’ furnaces.

Demystifying Glass
The blown glass art industry continued to thrive, but the art was still practiced in strict secrecy. That changed in the 17th century, when a book entitled L’Arte Vetraria (The Art of Glass) was written by Italian priest Antonio Neri. Neri’s book became a bible for glassmakers, revealing recipes for making glass, the equipment used and the glass-blowing techniques. Now any glass blowing artist could adopt the techniques that had been perfected by Italian artisans.

Glassblowing studios spread throughout Europe and the art was brought to America by the early settlers of Jamestown. Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, glass production became somewhat industrialized, and glass was used for artistic, practical and scientific purposes.

By the early 20th century, glass artists once again began to be recognized for their contribution to this fine art. Glass artists such as Emile Galle, Eugene Rouseau and Maurice Marinot became quite well known for their blown glass art. During the 1960s, the studio glass movement saw great experimentation in glass design and glass blowing techniques. Even today, glass blowers around the world are continuing to experiment, creating new and exciting techniques and designs in hand blown glass.   -Jenney Cheever

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July 11, 2009

Amethyst, Gemstone of Peace

Author: Cathy Lynn

Amethyst is a popular gemstone often used in art jewelry.  The color purple is the color of royalty and amethyst has been used since the dawn of history to adorn the rich and powerful monarchs and rulers. Today, amethyst is a lovely and affordable gemstone that is fortunately available in a wide variety of cut and uncut stones that we can all possess and admire.

Amethyst gem and nuggets, 18k gold, by Julie Shaw

Amethyst gem and nuggets, 18k gold, by Julie Shaw

Most amethyst gemstones on the market today are heat-treated to produce a deeper color. Heat treating is permanent and these stones will not fade over time. 

Amethyst is the official birthstone for February as adopted by the American National Association of Jewelers in 1912. It is also the birth stone for the Zodiac sign of Pisces. Amethyst is suggested as a gem to give on the 4th, 6th and 17th wedding anniversaries.

Healing and Protective Properties of Amethyst
The stone of peace. Calms fears, raises hopes, lifts spirits. Helps overcome addictions. Increases psychic awareness. Aids good judgment. Helps insomnia, headaches and alcohol recovery.  Crown chakra.

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July 8, 2009

ARTIST PROFILE: Peggy Russell

Author: admin

peggy_scarf_blogArtist’s Statement – Peggy Russell believes in creating fashion trends, not following them. She has been creating beautiful and unusual wearable art clothing and accessories since 1986. Bold patterns and colorful images.

Creative Process – People always wonder how we create our art. We produce each and every piece by hand, thoughtfully and carefully, one at a time. We work with hand mixed dyes on 100% silk fabric on cotton denim dropcloth, laid out on long worktables. Drawing our images on to the silk, then hand painting, carefully choosing and blending our dyes. The silk pieces are heat set, washed and ironed and are ready to go as scarves or stitched into clothing and neckties. The dropcloth, which has taken on the patterns and colors of the silks, is re-embellished and crafted into our bags and housewares.

“Art for the body and Soul” – everything is eco-friendly, no materials wasted.

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July 8, 2009

ARTIST PROFILE: Eduardo Milieris

Author: admin
The Montevideo by Eduardo Milieriss  The Montevideo by Eduardo Milieriss

Uruguay-born artist Eduardo Milieris has been fascinated by the integration of art and time since he was a child. Today he combines art with time in his beautiful limited-edition handcrafted watches. Milieris’ designs are “industrial chic” – made from recycled metals, embellished with sterling silver, copper, and brass. The metals are distressed and oxidized to give the watches a look akin to “buried treasure.” Finally, the artist paints each watch face by hand, giving it a distinct appearance.

 I work on silver, copper, and brass in the same ways they were used hundreds of years ago, preserving a tradition of craftsmanship.  My timepieces suggest the reality of constant change and evolution. 

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